Category Archives: Writing

A continuing dialogue on the art and the science of writing.

Die on Every Hill: Reflections on the Maranatha Conference

By Hope Bolinger a professional writing student at Taylor University One season of cross country taught me that you cannot die on every hill during a 5K race. Because in the miserable state of Ohio, every race sported at least five large mounds. Some shot up at a straight 90-degree angle, where runners had to […]
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Writing for Kids: Easy, Right?

By Megan Burkhart a professional writing major at Taylor University Writing for kids should be easy, oh no it is not that breezy; in fact you might just sound cheesy. Writing is not lemon squeezy. Cute little poem, right? Just throw some words together and make sure the ends rhyme. Create some cute characters and have […]
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Writers Watching Movies: Much More Than “I Liked it”

By Theresa Hughes a professional writing student at Taylor University A few days ago, I had the opportunity to re-watch the new movie, Wonder Woman. Apart from it simply being an enjoyable movie, Wonder Woman has all the things a good movie should. It has three dimensional characters, a good character arc for the main […]
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How Your Proposal is Like a Job Interview

By Hope Bolinger Working on a pub board for IlluminateYA and as a submissions intern at Hartline Literary, I’ve received dozens of “applicants” for both companies. Each proposal, like a person, carries its distinct personality. And like all tightly run companies, we can accept a mere fraction of the personalities which burst into our inboxes. […]
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On Writing Villains

By Jori Hanna There are a few things that the majority of villains have. They have a motive, opportunity, and some connection to the main character, assuming that the protagonist is a hero. But what makes a villain good at being bad? There are a few different types of villains. There’s the creepy villains, the […]
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The Art of Writing: The Quest for Originality

By Megan Burkhart We’ve all heard it. Accepted it. The number of original (or basic) story plots can be counted on our two hands. It has all been said and done before. Or has it? Originality often seems to constrict us writers rather than free us. Many of us have had doubts about our creations. Is […]
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How to Survive Rejection Slips

by G. Connor Salter Getting rejection slips is always difficult. It doesn’t even seem to matter how big your project is, even getting a 500-word article rejected can hurt. However, all writers deal with rejection sometime in their careers – some would argue it’s a kind of initiation. Here are three reminders to help you survive […]
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The Art of Writing: Satisfaction in the Blogosphere

By: Rebecca A. Schriner, Graduate December 2016 I’ll admit it: I was nervous when the big assignment for my Author Platform class was creating a blog. While I’d been in the PWR major for three years, my specialty had always been editing. Not writing. I’d tried a writing blog once. Little stories that came to […]
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The Art of Writing: What I’ve Learned From The Echo

by Luke Wildman I scrape my fingers over my scalp, then turn aching eyes back to my computer monitor. For the next four or so hours, I know my Thursday evening will be a blur of editing articles, brainstorming titles, texting questions to writers, and working with The Echo team to create the best weekly newspaper […]
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The Science of Writing: How to Make Anything into Material

by G. Connor Salter You’d think more people would’ve shown, I thought. I was sitting with four other people outside the PWR classroom in Nussbaum—Andrea Gregory, two Taylor alumni, and Ben Wolf, founder of Splickety Publishing Group. It was May 6, 2016, and Wolf had offered to come give a free evening class on how […]
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